Future Human: Work by Shelby Burchett (Goo Witch), Kevin Heckart, Thad Kellstadt, Anne Vieux, and Angela Washko

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Future Human

Opening March 17th 6-9pm

PLUG Projects presents Future Human, an exhibition featuring the work of Shelby Burchett (Goo Witch), Kevin Heckart, Thad Kellstadt, Anne Vieux, and Angela Washko in response to the present landscape of ever expanding technologies. The artists of Future Human propose plausible futures populated with analog and virtual modes of connection and escape. Material, surface, and space are presented as unfixed and illusory within the works. These suggested futures invite conversation about the direction of human consciousness, call attention to approaching possibilities, and usher in new systems of philosophical, social, and spiritual beliefs.

Say I Am: Lauren Frances Adams, Caroline Wells Chandler, Pixy Liao, and Yvonne Osei

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September 16, 2016 – October 29, 2016

Opening, September 16, PLUG Projects presents Say I Am, an exhibition featuring the work of Lauren Frances Adams, Caroline Wells Chandler, Pixy Liao, and Yvonne Osei. These artists address agency and challenge assumptions within a historically patriarchal heteronormative structure. Providing a contrast to the dominant landscape, deviations from expected gendered, cultural, or racial narratives are presented. Whether speaking from one’s experience or for an individual’s right to self determinism, each artist lends a transgressive hand to support new ways of thinking.

Lauren Frances Adams earned her BFA at UNC-Chapel Hill, and completed her MFA in 2007 at Carnegie Mellon University. She lives and works in Baltimore. She has exhibited at Nymans House National Trust (Sussex, England),  The Walters Museum (MD), The Mattress Factory (PA), and Smack Mellon (NY). She attended the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, and has held residencies at the Cite in Paris and the Sacatar Foundation in Brazil. She is the recipient of the Joan Mitchell Foundation MFA Award, and a 2016 Pollock-Krasner Foundation Award. Her work has been reviewed in Frieze Magazine, The Baltimore Sun, Artslant, and Hyperallergic.  Lauren is a founding member of Ortega y Gasset Projects, a project space in New York.

Caroline Wells Chandler’s brightly colored hand-crocheted works explore notions of queerness and sexuality as well as the art historical canon. His characters are radically queer, and his representations of gender declare queerness as the normative state. Chandler completed his foundation studies at the Rhode Island School of Design and received his BFA cum laude from Southern Methodist University in 2007. He has shown at numerous institutions including: Roberto Paradise (San Juan, Puerto Rico), Lord Ludd (PA), Art League Houston (TX), Zurcher Studio (NY), Field Projects (NY), Vox Populi (PA), Sanctuary (PA), N’Namdi Center for Contemporary Art (MI), Open Gallery (TN), and the Stieglitz Museum (‘s-Hertogenbosch, The Netherlands) among others. Chandler is a 2011 MFA recipient in painting at the Yale School of Art where he was awarded the Ralph Mayer Prize for proficiency in materials and techniques. He lives and works in New York.
Pixy Liao was born and raised in Shanghai, China and currently resides in Brooklyn. She is a recipient of NYFA Fellowship in photography, En Foco’s New Works Fellowship and LensCulture Exposure Awards, etc,. She has done artist residencies at Pioneer Works, Light Work, Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, Center for Photography at Woodstock, and Camera Club of New York. Liao’s photographs have been exhibited internationally, including He Xiangning Art Museum (China),  Asia Society (Houston), Flower Gallery (NY),  First Draft Gallery (Sydney), VT Artsalon (Taiwan), Kips Gallery (Korea), The Running Horse Contemporary Art Space (Lebanon),  Format (UK), Noorderlicht (Netherland), etc. Liao holds a MFA in photography from University of Memphis.

Yvonne Osei is a German-born Ghanaian artist living in the United States who is hyperaware of her hybridity. She describes herself as an outsider artist making insider art, referencing her West African roots while acknowledging her close to six years living in St. Louis, Missouri.

Momentarily: Yoonmi Nam

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MOMENTARILY
September 16, 2016 – October 29, 2016Opening, September 16, PLUG Projects presents Momentarily, a solo exhibition featuring the work of Yoonmi Nam. In response to the ever-changing parade of disposable objects we encounter on a daily basis, Momentarily presents works made from cast glass, porcelain, and paper that contend with contradictory senses of time through materiality and image.
Yoonmi Nam was born and raised in Seoul, South Korea, spending part of her youth in Canada.  She received a B.F.A. degree in Printmaking from Hongik University in Seoul, Korea.  She moved to America to study at the Rhode Island School of Design, where she received a M.F.A. degree in Painting and Printmaking in 2000.  Her work considers the cross-cultural experience and sense of transience throu­gh prints, installations and drawings.  Nam uses images of man-made environments and the culture of cut flower arrangements as metaphors to evoke a sense of time that is both fleeting and eternal.  Currently, she is an Associate Professor in the Department of Visual Art at the University of Kansas.

Out There: Sarah Belknap and Joseph Belknap, Daniel J. Glendening, Corwin Levi, Siobhan McBride, and Sean McFarland

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Plug Projects is proud to present Out There, a group exhibition including the work of Sarah Belknap and Joseph Belknap, Daniel J. Glendening, Corwin Levi, Siobhan McBride, and Sean McFarland. The artists in this exhibition revel in the possibilities of what exists beyond the world we know combining cosmic elements with nighttime logic to create a sense of the otherworldly. The artists in the exhibition explore among other things the cosmos, the lunar landscape, and the sense of connectivity that comes with stargazing. There is an appreciation for celestial as historic inspiration, delighting many an armchair astronaut with the contemplation of unknowable truths.

About the artists

Sarah Belknap (b. 1983) and Joseph Belknap (b. 1979) are Chicago-based interdisciplinary artists and educators who received their MFAs from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Working in collaboration with each other since 2008, their art has been exhibited at the Arts Club of Chicago, the Chicago Artists’ Coalition, Western Exhibitions and Comfort Station, as well as in artist-run exhibition spaces in Brooklyn, Detroit, and St. Louis. In addition, they have presented performances at institutions throughout Chicago, including the Chicago Cultural Center, Hyde Park Art Center, Links Hall, and at the MCA. Most recently the Belknaps had a solo show at the MCA as part of the BMO Harris Bank: Chicago Works series. www.sarahandjoseph.com

Daniel J. Glendening (b. 1982, California) is pursuing a research-based practice in an attempt to understand the nature of belief. He holds an MFA in Visual Studies from Pacific Northwest College of Art and a dual BA in Art Studio and English with an emphasis in Creative Writing from the University of California at Davis. He is a founding member of the artist-led paranormal research team GWC, Investigators. His work has been exhibited nationally and internationally at venues such as S.H.E.D. Projects, Oakland, CA; Disjecta, Portland, OR; ArtVilnius, Vilnius, Lithuania; and online at Amur Initiatives, ACRE TV and elsewhere. He has published work with various journals and publishing houses, including Drain Magazine, Publication Studio and Social Malpractice Publishing, and has participated as an artist in residence at The Wassaic Project, Wassaic NY; High Desert Test Sites, Joshua Tree, CA and Rupert, Vilnius, Lithuania. www.danieljglendening.com

Corwin Levi is a mixed media, project-based artist residing in Washington, DC. His undertakings include looking at ruptured walls and finding faint fields, investigating gin piles, capturing the inside of eyelids, pulling moments from the void, and seeing how long people can hold their breath for shine. He has presented solo projects at venues including the Roswell Museum and Art Center in New Mexico; Second Street Gallery in Charlottesville, Virginia; Hillyer Art Space in Washington, DC; and James Madison University in Virginia. He has completed numerous residencies including the Roswell Artist-in-Residence Program, the Millay Colony, Ucross, Elsewhere, and Willapa Bay. He has completed murals at Art Farm (NE) and North Adams, Massachusetts across from MassMoca. Corwin has curated exhibitions at Kirkland Arts Center at Seattle, Rice University in Houston, and publishing a contemporary artists’ edition of Grimms’ Tales. He has an MFA from the Tyler School of Art and a BA from Rice University. www.corwinlevi.com

Siobhan McBride was born in Seoul, South Korea and currently lives in Miami. She received her MFA in painting from the University of Pennsylvania in 2005. Using gouache on a small scale, she depicts views of a world that is both familiar and strange, airless and anticipatory. She was an artist in residence at Yaddo, Jentel, Lower Manhattan Cultural Council’s Workspace Program, Roswell Artist- in-Residence Program, and the Vermont Studio Center. Her work has been exhibited at NURTUREart, the Pelham Art Center, Eight Modern, and this past winter at Miami Project with DC Moore. www.siobhanmcbride.com

Sean McFarland’s work explores the relationships between the history and processes of image making, veracity, and the representation of landscape. He earned his MFA from the California College of the Arts in 2004. He has exhibited at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Berkeley Art Museum, White Columns, and Yerba Buena Center for the Arts. He has received the 2005 Phelan Art Award in Photography, 2009 Baum Award for an Emerging American Photographer, 2009 John Guttmann Photography Fellowship, and a 2011 Eureka Fellowship. His work is the collections at SFMOMA, Milwaukee Art Museum, Oakland Museum, Berkeley Art Museum, and the Whitney Museum of American Art Library. Sean currently lives and works in Rochester, New York, where he is a Visiting Assistant Professor at the Rochester Institute of Technology. www.sean-mcfarland.com

Correlation of Space: Gehry Kohler and Vincent Como

posted in: Blog, Endless, Exhibitions | 0

I recently have became familiar with Kansas City based artist, Gehry Kohler.  More specifically, his process-based drawings.  The drawings, at first glance, resemble minimalist works of the 1960’s, but upon closer examination his detailed labor intensive process starts to show.  Layer after layer of ball point pen atop flat opaque color.  This additive/reductive process pushes the bright painted surface closer to where it began; the color begins to disappear.

On Friday night Kohler will be showing new work at City Ice Arts (formerly City Arts Project) along with New York based artist, Vincent Como.

Correlation of Space: Gehry Kohler & Vincent Como

Opening on Friday, September 7 from 6-9pm

At the City Ice building in Hospital Hill, Kansas City, Missouri

2015 Campbell Street, Kansas City, Missouri 64108

Show is open September 7 – October 20, 2012

all images courtesy of EG Schempf

Grant Miller

posted in: Architecture, Art, Artists, Blog, Uncategorized | 0

In Grant Miller‘s work, layers of paint build upon architectural interiors into obsessively constructed abstract forms. Grant uses the interior spaces that be begins with as framework for the final painting, which reveals little of its skeletal underpinnings. There is apparent dedication to a diligent additive process. The sometimes transparent layers allowing a peek through to the incremental layers, providing the viewer with a sort of labyrinth of structural beams and right angles interrupted intermittently with organic marbling and colorful pattern.

Evidence of Grant’s very streamlined and systematic approach can be found in the close knit relationships from one painting to the next. One wonders if his current work will become a skeleton for some other system eventually, giving way to another layer built over his current methodical, colorful blueprints.

Grant Miller currently has an online exhibition at Byron Cohen Gallery.

Kansas City Architecture Tour

posted in: Architecture, Art, Blog | 0

A trip to the symphony last week at the Kaufman Center’s amazing new Performing Arts Building inspired me to search for a tour of Kansas City’s architectural highlights. I found this city guide on Arch Daily‘s website. They highlight 12 of KC’s more striking buildings (several of which, I would note, are art centers of some kind.) It’s also somehow satisfying to note how many of these buildings are fairly new to the skyline…a handful having opened their doors in the past 5 years or so.

Jonah Criswell

posted in: Blog, Living Arrangements | 0

Most of Jonah Criswell’s paintings and drawings are concerned with empty domestic interiors where the mood, color and light of the spaces depicted assume centrality.
Physical interiors considered in this way become metaphors of internal states of mind- ambiguous and varied, yet persistently melancholic. There is nothing creepy or theatrical about these pieces; to me they are moments with a certain symbolic “surplus of meaning” burdened by memory. www.jonahcriswell.com

2008 Guache and ink on paper 48 x 90in.
2007 Oil on Panel 33in x 43in
2009 Watercolor on Paper 9.25 x 12
2005 Graphite on Paper 29in x 29in

Single Family, Colonial – Kansas City

posted in: Blog, Living Arrangements | 1
Photo courtesy of: William Fischer, Jr., May 21, 2011


Inspired by Nicole’s amazing post a couple of weeks ago where she was looking at and analyzing the diversity among Kansas City’s modern house culture, I have decided to highlight another interesting Kansas City neighborhood, Janssen Place.

The Janssen Place neighborhood is located within the larger, Hyde Park Neighborhood.  The original layout for the neighborhood was drawn by Arthur E. Stilwell in 1897.   Stilwell was born in New York and first came to Kansas City in 1879, he was interested in the potential of starting a railroad in Kansas City.  He spent the first ten years of his Kansas City life starting a Trust Company and allowed Stilwell to start construction on the railroad.  During the time the railroad was being built there were problems, delays and Wall Street failures which forced Stilwell to turn to Dutch financiers for support.

The Janssen Place neighborhood was modeled after residental neighborhoods in New York and St. Louis, “a formal area for upper class dwellings.” The name Janssen Place came from August Janssen, a Dutch capitalist who was a good friend of Arthur Stilwell.

You can find more information about Arthur Stilwell and the Janssen Place Neighborhood here:

http://hydeparkkansascity.retrosites.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=15&Itemid=32

Image from Rechelle Unplugged: http://www.rechelleunplugged.com/2009/09/a-walk-through-historic-janssen-place-hyde-park-kansas-city/
Image from William Fischer, Jr.: http://www.hmdb.org/marker.asp?marker=44401


 

Yanda House & Cellophane Rain

posted in: Blog, Living Arrangements | 0

Did you know Kansas City is peppered with unique and visionary modern domestic dwellings? One fortuitous night, we took the long way home. In the narrow, meandering lanes of the Roanoke/Valentine neighborhood of midtown Kansas City, we stumbled upon this domestic gem. It happened to be the “magic hour”- when diffuse sunlight makes all colors burn just a bit brighter. Imagine rolling up to a bright citron yellow, domed home, on steel stilts. This residence is the non-sequiter of its neighborhood (just around the corner is Thomas Hart Benton’s former live-work space which is composed of muscular looking stone; a traditional Missouri building material). This hard-edged home gives new meaning to the term “domicile.” There is a small room at the top center that has a Plexiglass bubble from a bomber. According to this site, the builder/designer Albert J. Yanda, had to fight the city in order to utilize (“unsightly”) steel beams for support and won. I have heard rumors that you can make arrangements to tour this home free of charge. How does living and toiling in a “curated” or at the very least mediated space impact the kind of artwork we make?


Yanda Residence Kansas City, MO 1966

1966 Yanda Residence
Architect: Albert J. Yanda
Designed: 1965
Builder: Albert J. Yanda
Built: 1966
Size: 1700sq. ft. 2 bedroom 2 bath
Photographer: Unknown
The Yanda Residence was built by Architect, Albert J. Yanda for himself and his wife. The structure, built of steel, sits on what was considered for years to be an unbuildable lot. His creative response to the site is an introverted façade to the street and a soaring glass filled structure to the rear. The inspiration for this house may have been looking West to John Lautner’s Chemosphere house in California , built a few years earlier. Not long after completing this house Yanda would move west himself. Yanda had previously been in the employ of David B. Runnells, Architect to several early Drummond Projects. Yanda’s initials appear on many of Runnells’ drawings as the draftsman of these plans.

A fantastic flickr pic of the Yanda home in winter.

More information on the Yanda Residence and its Roanoke neighborhood.

 

On another note, here is a domestic gem we discovered while cross-referencing KC Modern Homes. Wow. All I can imagine is listening to Earth Wind and Fire tracks during all the swinging parties that must have taken place at its base. It makes so much sense- a fireplace with fringe on top in Missouri…

1965 Hyde Residence
Architect: Bruce Goff
Designed: 1964
Builder: Michael Rothstein Construction
Built: 1965
Size: 3400 sq ft. 5 bedroom 3 ½ bathThis is a raised rectangular plan with a partial basement. The ten foot by ten foot central skylight over the brick hearth is penetrated by the fireplace chimney, which has a purple mirrored triangular wall behind. Strips of “cellophane rain” hang from the skylight, creating a magic play of light on carpet and walls. With a fire burning, you understand the concept of Earth, Fire and Water. Many people know the house from the use of green dime store ashtrays used as stained glass elements in the doors and railing. 

Because Kansas City remains a car-centric city, I suggest taking a KCModern driving tour to view modern domestic spaces:

Driving Tour #1

Driving Tour #2

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